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Larry David speaks onstage during “An Evening With Larry David — A Farewell To ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm'” hosted by HBO & Tribeca Film in New York City on April 5, two days before the series finale. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images)
Larry David speaks onstage during “An Evening With Larry David — A Farewell To ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’” hosted by HBO & Tribeca Film in New York City on April 5, two days before the series finale. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images)
David Allen
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Remember when HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm” , way back in March 2023? I’d almost forgotten it myself, and I was there.

Nearly 13 months later, the shoot ended up as a scene in the series finale. (Apparently it takes a lot of effort to produce a semi-improvised comedy.)

At the time, we looky-loos along Claremont’s College Avenue outside the stately Carnegie Building, which seemed to be standing in for a courthouse in Atlanta. That proved to be true.

As the finale April 7 revealed, series star and creator Larry David was heading to court after inadvertently violating Georgia election law. He had casually given an old acquaintance a bottle of water while she was waiting in line to vote.

This made him a flash point for voting-rights debates. Outside the courthouse, protesters chanted “Free Larry” or held signs reading “Justice for Larry,” while one counter-protester brandished a sign declaring “I Don’t Trust the Guy.” Ted Danson, a frequent “Curb” guest, was there in Claremont for the scene.

"Curb Your Enthusiasm" shot a scene at Pomona College's Carnegie Building in Claremont on March 13, 2023 that was used in the series' April 7, 2024 finale. Finally! (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)
“Curb Your Enthusiasm” shot a scene at Pomona College’s Carnegie Building in Claremont on March 13, 2023 that was used in the series’ April 7, 2024 finale. Finally! (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

College Avenue is shown, as is Bridges Auditorium and the Carnegie Building. To disguise Claremont’s leafy, low-rise look, “Curb” had to get creative. Rob Lawrence posted screenshots on the . As Ron Scott remarked: “I like how they superimposed the Atlanta skyline behind Pomona College.”

Making Claremont resemble Atlanta must have blown the season’s entire special-effects budget.

This “Curb” episode was a meta-commentary on the last, controversial episode of “Seinfeld,” which Larry David wrote. In that finale, Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer are convicted of violating a Good Samaritan law by refusing to help someone. In “Curb,” Larry is found guilty of doing a good deed, which is very unlike him.

He goes to jail. But, aided by Jerry Seinfeld, he’s freed on a technicality and goes home.

The episode’s apt title: “No Lessons Learned.”

More ‘Curb’

Two related notes. Pomona College has been the scene of , including a sit-down street protest last Thursday that briefly blocked College Avenue, only paces from the fake protest on “Curb.”

And the glimpse of in “Curb” reminds me that in 2017, “Seinfeld” star Jason Alexander, who played George Costanza, and whose son was attending Pomona College, . What are the odds that two “Seinfeld” figures would ever visit the same block of Claremont, even six years apart?

It was an entertaining talk, by the way.

“I’m a college dropout,” Alexander said at one point. “But I think it’s great that colleges invite me as an example to young people.”

History Day in SB

History Day at the Santa Fe, the event Saturday at the Santa Fe Depot in San Bernardino, seemed like a success to anyone present. Inland Empire history mavens from the desert and suburbia alike converged at the train station.

They bought books and posters, toured the depot’s San Bernardino History and Railroad Museum, listened to pioneer music, joined historical societies and made connections with like-minded folks.

I met Kelli Shapiro, whose new book, “Inland Empire and San Gabriel Valley Movie Theatres,” is a likely future topic in this space.

Most visitors glanced at my table and kept walking, which was to be expected. But subscribers from all four IE newspaper territories that run my column — Riverside, Redlands, Ontario and San Bernardino — stopped to say hello.

Some wished me a happy belated birthday. Most encouraged me to keep writing, said they rely on me to keep them informed and entertained — awww — or expressed their loyalty to our product. Among the diehards is Mark Johnson of Hemet, who assured me: “I will never stop taking the paper.”

A few folks said they recognized me right off. Said Peter Lenker of Redlands: “You’re better looking than you are in the paper, and you can quote me.” A second reader said the same.

In a somewhat contrary view, a third reader told me I look exactly the same in person as I do in the paper.

As long as I don’t look worse in person. That would be bad.

brIEfly

This exhibit at the Riverside Art Museum is by Brooklyn artist Rico Gatson, who grew up in Riverside. (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)
This exhibit at the Riverside Art Museum is by Brooklyn artist Rico Gatson, who grew up in Riverside. (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

At the through Sunday, April 21, is an exhibit of collage portraits of such Black creative figures as Chuck Berry, Alice Coltrane, Isaac Hayes and bell hooks. Artist lives in Brooklyn, but he grew up in Riverside in the 1970s and ’80s and graduated from North High, where he played on the football team. His mother lives in Moreno Valley. “He was so proud: ‘I get to do a show in my hometown,’” curator Lisa Henry told me. “His whole family came to the opening in February. It was so fun.”

David Allen writes Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, proudly. Email dallen@scng.com, phone 909-483-9339, like davidallencolumnist on Facebook and follow @davidallen909 on Twitter.

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